Mascoma: Consolidated Bioprocessing

Mascoma is a cellulosic ethanol producer company. It also provides technology for the conversion of biomass into renewable fuela. Company’s corporate office is located in Lebanon, New Hampshire, United States. Mascoma has developed bioengineered yeasts for its proprietary consolidated bioprocessing technology.

Feedstock

Mascoma’s cellulosic ethanol pilot plant is capable of using a wide variety of materials, including wood chips, corn stover, sugar cane bagasse 10450151_680657768650710_5470902751896477621_nand grasses.

Consolidated Bioprocessing

Conversion of cellulosic biomass into fuel ethanol involves various steps. The most difficult step is the breaking down of the complex sugars found in biomass into simple fermentable sugars while the fermentation of these simple sugars are attempted in the next step. The consolidated bioprocessing combines these two steps into a single step. This results in significant reduction in the cost of the process. Mascoma utilizes genetically modified yeasts and bacteria able to produce enzymes necessary for both the steps to convert cellulosic biomass into ethanol.

In its initial stage the company has developed proprietary Mascoma Grain Technology, MGT® yeast product. These are drop-in substitutes of traditional yeasts used in much developed corn based ethanol industry for ethanol fermentation. In December 2003, the company has announced that its consolidated bioprocessing technology (CBP) platform has been used to produce over 1 billion gallons of renewable fuel.

Mascoma is now working towards the development and construction of commercial scale facility to convert hardwood feedstocks into cellulosic ethanol utilizing its consolidated bioprocessing technology platform.

Demonstration Plant, Rome, New York

This is Mascoma Corporation’s first pilot plant which produces cellulosic ethanol from non-food biomass. It became operational in 2009. The production capacity of the plant is 200,000 gallons of ethanol per year. At present they are utilizing wood chips as feedstock which is being bought from a local sawmill. The plant is feedstock flexible and can use corn stover, sugar cane bagasse and grasses.

Commercial Scale plant, Kinross, Michigan

This will be the commercial scale plant using Mascoma’s consolidated  bioprocessing technology. It is being developed in Kinross, Michigan. State University of New York – College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Cornell University and Clarkson University are among the Mascoma’s research partner for the venture. It is expected to have a production capacity of 20 million gallons per year.

Reference
http://www.mascoma.com/

QTEROS is also a leading cellulosic ethanol producer company utilizing consolidated bioprocessing technology. http://biofueluptodate.com/consolidated-bioprocessing-qteros/
You may like to know about different technologies to produce cellulosic ethanol, click  http://biofueluptodate.com/second-generation-biofuels-bioethanol/

Want to know about other cellulosic ethanol producers
Bioethanol from Waste Biomass INEOS Bio http://biofueluptodate.com/bioethanol-waste-biomass-ineos-bio/
from municipal solid waste http://biofueluptodate.com/cellulosic-ethanol-municipal-solid-waste/
from corn residue http://biofueluptodate.com/cellulosic-ethanol-corn-residues/
from lignocellulosic biomass http://biofueluptodate.com/ethanol-abengoa-bioenergy/

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Solazyme http://biofueluptodate.com/algae-biofuel-producers/
Blue petroleum from microalgae  http://biofueluptodate.com/blue-petroleum-from-microalgae/
Ethanol Production from Algae http://biofueluptodate.com/ethanol-production-from-algae-algenol/

First Generation Biofuels  http://biofueluptodate.com/first-generation-biofuels/
Second Generation Biofuels  http://biofueluptodate.com/second-generation-biofuels-bioethanol/
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Fourth Generation Biofuels http://biofueluptodate.com/drop-in-fuels/

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